What’s Your MESSAGE?

I was recently asked by a non-profit leader for my “best advice” to someone who is trying to raise funds for their organization.

I thought about it for a minute, then replied simply that the most important thing to think about is YOUR MESSAGE.

Here are some foundational questions:

*What are you wanting to do? What is the purpose behind the project/activity?

*What are the results that you’re hoping to realize from the project/activity?

*Why are YOU wanting to do this project/activity?

 

Doug Brendel writes about YOUR MESSAGE:

THE MESSAGE is more important than the mechanics of communicating it.

THE MESSAGE must compete with thousands of other matters intruding on the donor’s attention.

THE MESSAGE therefore must be repeated constantly, in terms that the donors understand, and in ways that make it count for them.

(The 7 Deadly Diseases of Ministry Marketing: Berkey, Brendel & Sheline ©1998)

 

This is what I’ve learned, and what I continue to learn:

When we talk about FUNDRAISING, it’s not about having connections to people with resources.

The most important thing to do first, is to define your message so that people are able to understand:

*WHAT you’re wanting to do and WHY you’re wanting to do it.

Sometimes we make it much more complicated than it needs to be.

 

Our job isn’t to coerce people into getting involved and giving to the project/activity.

Our job is to share the plan, the purpose and the outcome, and INVITE people to consider getting involved. This is their decision, not ours.

 

For those of us that believe that GOD really does own it all, our job is to share what He has called us to do, and invite others to seek God’s direction for their involvement. It’s not about us!

We can’t talk about FUNDRAISING without laying this foundation.

There is work involved in fundraising, and there’s real work involved as you refine your message and figure out the best way to capture and present it, but fundraising isn’t a mechanical activity. We’re trying to connect with people’s hearts, and our job is to do the best that we can do, and then trust God to move them and lead them in the way that HE would have them go and be involved.

For more on FUNDRAISING, CLICK HERE

Posted in Leadership Coaching, Organizational Development

Russ’ Replenishment Cycle

Today was my 53rd birthday. We had a wonderful BBQ yesterday with some family and friends to celebrate, then today I was able to do some things that I wanted to do.

This past year, I did a LifePlan. It was a two-day process meeting one-on-one with a LifePlan facilitator, and the process was incredible. We began by spending time gaining perspective, and from that process, I was able to develop a plan for the next stage of my life, and I actually walked out with the tools and tasks I needed to address in order to accomplish this plan. I’m excited about the next year, and the next 10 years to come, always striving to be a “better me”, more like the person I was created to be.

One of the tools I used in my LifePlan was called the “Replenishment Cycle”. The question asked of me was, “what refuels you?” I was forced to think, to dig deep, to find things in my routines and in my life that bring energy, that bring rest, that bring refreshment. It was really good for me to work through a process of defining the activities that “fill me up”, and then I was able to set some goals for how to integrate these activities more intentionally into my life.

Back to my birthday today…

I spent some time focused on “replenishing my soul”.

This is what my day looked like, but remember, it was my birthday, so I took some additional time off of work to celebrate the day!

• I slept for over 8 hours last night, I have the best mattress sizes at home, it is hard not to sleep as much. A much-needed night of FULL sleep. This alludes me often, but last night, it was wonderful!

• I began the day at the gym. It was great to get my heart rate up on the treadmill, listen to a podcast, and spend some time with some weights.

• Following the gym, my wife and I had some breakfast, then we went down to the harbor to paddle board. We love to be on the water, and it was a beautiful day. Not only was it time together, but it was some light exercise and time outdoors!

• I then went to work for the afternoon, and I was energized and ready to take on a couple of key projects today.

• I got home from work, and the sun was still out, so my wife and I got on the motorcycle and went for a ride along the coast, enjoying a beautiful sunset, a great fish salad, and a really nice ride.

This isn’t my normal day, but it was my birthday. I was reminded of some things that restore me.

Looking at my LifePlan, I identified 5 key activities that I want to put into my life as often as I can:

  1. Daily Exercise
  2. Time in the Word of God
  3. Time Alone (not just being alone, but time thinking, dreaming, praying)
  4. Helmet Time. I’ve ridden a motorcycle since I was 12 years old. Some of my best thinking comes when I’m on my bike, helmet on, and I’m just cruising down the road. I need more of this!
  5. Adventure. Sometimes life just gets mundane. I need to create adventure regularly in my life.

These might not be yours, and these may change for me in the years to come, but today, I feel rejuvenated and refreshed. I’m not ready to go to bed yet, because it was a really good day. I’m ready for tomorrow, and ready to continue to learn to put these things into my life as often as possible.

What replenishes your soul? What routines have you forgot about or ignored? What are some simple things you can do to rediscover these life-giving activities?

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Do I Want to BE the Best or Do I Want THE Best?

The answer to that question reveals if we’re selfish leaders or selfless leaders. It answers if the organization is about ourselves or if it’s about the vision. Wanting the best for the organization will be the result of doing what’s best for the team, and the team needs to be ENCOURAGED. One of the hats leaders need to wear is the hat of CHEERLEADER.

One of the unsung heroes of the Bible was a man named Barnabas. He really lived out the meaning of his name, “son of encouragement”. Every time you see him pop up in the Bible, he’s coming alongside somebody encouraging them, believing in them. When the leaders didn’t trust the newly converted Paul, it was Barnabas who stood up for him (Acts 9:26-27). When John Mark had screwed up on a missions trip, it was Barnabas who didn’t give up on him (Acts 15:36-39). Both men accomplished great things for God and Barnabas played a big role in that.

Do you want the best, not just for your organization, but also for the people God’s placed in your life to lead? If so, here’s a practical acronym to remember for cheering your team on to be their B.E.S.T. It’s taken from John Maxwell’s book “Developing The Leaders Around You”. Here it is…

B elieve in them. Don’t assume they know. With your words and actions, remind them that you believe in them.

E ncourage them. Communicate specifically what you appreciate about them and how their contributions help the team.

S hare with them. We need to be accessible to our people. As the saying goes, “People don’t care how much you know until they know how much you care.”.

T rust them. Take some calculated risks and let them try some things that will expand their development and communicate your belief in their abilities.

Let’s be the best leaders we can be for our team. Pull out your pom-poms and cheer them on to be their best!

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Climb Every Mountain

Don’t worry, I’m not going to break into the wonderful song from the Sound of Music, but I am going to talk about “the mountain”.

We’ve been talking about the role every leader plays in being a CHEERLEADER. This is an important role in every team and in every organization. You, as the leader, have the opportunity to set a tone of affirmation, of encouragement and of support. When you spend time cheering your team members forward, they will accomplish the tasks you place before them, and they’ll often do more than you or they ever dreamed was possible!

I want to share 2 “cheerleading” experiences I’ve had in my life. I’ve had many, but these 2 stand out, and this is where the mountain comes in.

I was 11-years old, and my father and I, along with others from our scouting group, decided to climb Mt. Whitney. This mountain stands 14,505 feet high and is the highest peak in the contiguous United States. For an 11-year old, this was a major undertaking. I started off strong, but the higher we went on the mountain, I ran out of steam. I remember many times wanting to quit, but then my dad turned into a cheerleader. He began coaching me, challenging me, encouraging me, talking to me. He would say, “take 20 steps and then take a break”. I have no idea how I made it up all of the switchbacks, but we made it, step by step, and we celebrated at the top of the mountain. I ran most of the way down, and it wasn’t until years later that I realized that my dad had “coached” me up that mountain. He didn’t shame me, he didn’t carry me, he just walked with me and challenged me to not give up.

30 years later, I chose to climb another mountain. I was living in Ecuador at the time, and Cotopaxi was a 19,347 foot volcano that I saw almost every day, and I determined to climb it, so I asked my friend and guide, Rich Borman, to help me get to the Summit. The night we climbed, the weather was horrible. I had complained about the oxygen level 14,000 feet, I don’t think there was any oxygen at 18,000 feet. This was a tough climb, especially in bad weather. At one point, Rick asked me if I wanted to turn back, and I simply responded, “if I turn back now, I’ll never do this again.”

Rick took that as a challenge, and for the next 7 hours, he “coached” me to the top, along with another friend, Leonard. We took short steps, we took breaks, and we made it to the summit. The weather was so bad that I didn’t get to enjoy the victory because we needed to get off the mountain. Rick was my cheerleader that night, and because of his patience and perseverance, I was able to accomplish something that I never could have done on my own.

Think about the power of cheerleaders in your life. Who has been walking with you, encouraging you, helping you reach new heights?

Thing about your role as a cheerleader: Who are you encouraging and walking with?

We all need people to help us get where we’re going!

Hebrews 10:24 says this: “And let us consider how to stir up one another to love and good works.”

I like how The Message puts it, “Let’s see how inventive we can be in encouraging love and helping out…”

As leaders, we need to have cheerleaders in our lives and we need to be cheerleaders for others.

Thanks Dad and Rick for being my cheerleader, not just on the mountain, but in my life!

For more on CHEERLEADING

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Be A Stretcher Bearer

I remember the talk clearly. Michael Slater was speaking in our university chapel, and he used Mark 2 as his scripture. You can read the story, but it’s the story of some friends that carried their friend to Jesus to be healed, but they couldn’t get into the house, so they cut a hole in the roof and lowered their friend before Jesus. Jesus healed the man and everyone was amazed.

I had heard the story before, and the story speaks to Jesus’ power to heal, speaks to his challenging the leaders of the day, and speaks to his compassion.

As Michael Slater spoke that day, he asked a simple question, one that I still remember:

“If you were laying on a stretcher, wounded physically or emotionally, do you have 4 friends that would carry you to get help?”

I remember thinking about 4 people who I could call to carry my stretcher, or 4 people who would naturally come to my aid.

He then asked: “Now, who’s stretcher will you carry? Name the people.”

I did that too. It wasn’t just about what others would do for me, but about who I could serve and help.

The talk had a profound impact on my life as I have continually identified the people who would carry me if I needed them, and the people I would carry if they needed help.

Over the years, I’ve been carried by these friends, and I’ve had the opportunity to carry them.

The message here is ENCOURAGEMENT.  The message here is HOPE.  The message here is FRIENDSHIP.

One of my roles as a leader is to communicate to those that I lead or work with that they have value and that our relationship goes far beyond our “work roles”. I’m constantly trying to find ways to communicate that to the people I work with, and find ways to model that.

Here are 4 ways that you can encourage those you get the privilege of leading:

#1) KNOW THEM

I know you “know them”. I encourage you to “KNOW THEM”. Listen to their story, know their spouse and children’s names, understand their passion and purpose. Take the time to listen.

People like to be HEARD.

#2) GO OUT OF YOUR WAY

Take notice of what’s going on, and go out of your way to communicate your care, your support and your friendship. An example might be you support a cause that is important to them or you show up to celebrate with them something significant.

People like to be VALUED.

#3) COMMUNICATE

Look for creative ways to communicate with them how you feel about them. Send them a note, get them a gift card, spring for a latte. Little things make a big impact.

People like to be AFFIRMED.

#4) CARE FOR THEM

When there’s a crisis, be the first to respond. This means you’re aware of when crisis comes, but be ready. Provide a meal, stay late to help with a project, help them find a solution, do whatever you can do to help. Basically, help to “carry them” when they need it. Be one of their “stretcher bearers”.

People like to be SERVED.

We all need to learn to encourage others as we carry their stretchers in times of need and as we’re carried ourselves.

Are you a Stretcher Bearer?

To get Michael Slaters book, CLICK HERE

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Be A Cheerleader

“Two-four-six-eight, who do we appreciate…”

Being a cheerleader is basically expressing appreciation for the efforts of someone involved in a difficult situation. So, let’s talk about how to express appreciation.

Step #1…Getting started with a good habit:

A good way to start in the cheerleading business is to try to express your appreciation to one person every day. Start early. Don’t put it off. Tell a different person, every day, why you appreciate them. It should be more than a ‘thank you’. Make it a challenge to think of what to say and how to say it. You have to be honest, but it can focus on the littlest thing. “I so appreciate how you helped me the other day”, or, “I appreciate how you look when you come to the table”.

You will discover that it is really fun to see people try to figure out how to respond because, suddenly, they have experienced a rush of positive feelings, ‘warm fuzzies’ I call them, and none of us have much experience responding to warm fuzzies.

Step #2…Bounce it off others:

After a solid month of ‘getting started’ and being successful sharing appreciation with a person a day, start sharing your appreciation about another person each day. Tell person ‘A’ what you appreciate about person ‘B’ in a positive way. For example, during a conversation, as the conversation mentions a person’s name, let that be a trigger for you to say, “You know what I really appreciate about them?” and then say something you like about that person. It may even be something you have said to them personally.

You will change the conversation and you may encourage others to add something. If the group is like most groups, the conversation will eventually get reported to the person mentioned and your appreciation will be reinforced with more ‘warm fuzzies’.

Step #3…Use the word ‘again’:

If you see change in a person, maybe even in the area of your stated appreciation, then say to them, “I just want to say, once again, how much I appreciate…” and share your thoughts. Repeating your stated appreciation is an amazing reinforcement of positive behavior and can actually result in an increased effort to respond appropriately.

You can actually help someone else develop positive habits with positive reinforcement such as repeating your appreciation for them. But, be sure to be honest, not manipulative.

Expressing appreciation is indeed positive reinforcement, and positive reinforcement is a powerful, yet under used, force in helping people be who they want to be.

There is power in being appreciated! So, get started! Two-four-six-eight, who do we appreciate?

For more on being a CHEERLEADER in your leadership, CLICK HERE

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Leading and Communicating

If you want to be a good leader, you have to be able to communicate. It’s not just a skill to learn, but it’s a discipline to apply.

 

 

 

We know that there are 4 basic ways to communicate:

#1) SPEAKING

#2) LISTENING

#3) WRITING

#4) READING

Another form of communication that might not fit in the above list would be any “non-verbal” communication we do with body language, but let’s focus on the 4 above.

As a Leader:

*SPEAKING is essential. Speaking enables you to share your vision, your passion, your direction and to lead your team by inspiring them to action. We need to learn to speak clearly and how to use the right words to motivate the people around us.

Mike Myatt makes this point on Forbes.com:

“When you speak, know what you’re talking about.” He goes on to simply say that if you don’t possess the subject matter expertise needed, others won’t listen. You should be sure that you know what you’re talking about, or bring in the experts to help you! Don’t try to fake it. Others will see right through that.

*LISTENING is foundational. Many times, leaders spend twice as much time talking as they do listening. I’ve been reminded by others many times that God gave us 2 ears and 1 mouth for a reason!  Why is this so difficult to understand?

Neil Petch writes on Entrepreneur.com:

“Take the time to understand the situation before commenting.” He goes on to discuss the need for leaders to try to understand what is really going on instead of diving into new territory, making a lot of assumptions.

*WRITING is universal. With the growth of e-mail, Twitter and other social media, we use writing to communicate quickly and globally.

On Inc.com, the team writes about e-mail communication:

“E-mail has transformed communication, but many users of e-mail technology pay attention to basic rules of grammar and format when composing letters.” The article goes on to talk about how lazy we have gotten in our communication, and how unprofessional it is.

There are wonderful tools built into your computer that will check for spelling and grammar, yet we are often moving so fast that we don’t take the time to proof read our communication, to check to ensure that we’re saying what we want to say, and to say it clearly. We choose “quick communication” over “good communication”.

*READING is empowering. We read to learn and to gather information. We read to listen to others as they share their ideas in print. We read to connect to people around the world.

skillsyouneed.com talks about reading:

“Learning, therefore, comes about not from reading and remembering details, but from developing your understanding of the meaning of the details, and to engage with your ideas and opinions and rethink them in a positive and constructive way.”

Don’t read just to get through the text or the assignment. Read to be challenged in the way you think and form your opinions. Allow time to process what you’re reading.

I want to challenge you in your communication. If you want to be an effective leader, you need to learn to master the 4 communication mediums explained above, as well as others! Often one of the above comes more naturally than the others, so we rely on that. As a leader, learn to use all 4. Your team, your direct reports, your constituents, even your family and friends will appreciate it.

Be a Leader that Communicates!

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Communication

This is a word used to describe someone who has something to say, or thinks he does. At least, he or she has something they want other people to hear. When they speak, they are a ‘communicator’.

The Dictionary says that the word is a noun, an action word, and describes someone who in skilled in conveying information or ideas.

Other common words for a communicator may be informant, speaker, broadcaster or announcer. A communicator could also be seen as an alarmist, or a persuader or an affirmer. I suppose they could also be an author, a signer, a comforter, a respondent, or a presenter. I know one who is a gossiper and another who is a rambler. They come in all shapes and sizes.

But, here, in this space, we want to talk about leaders who are communicators. And, truth be told, there are some who are great and others who are terrible. All leaders have something they want or need to say, so how can we help you so people will hear and understand?

There you are…leader. You are called on to communicate, to be a communicator. The audience may be a large crowd or a small group. It may be donors giving money or staff spending money. You may have a message to both. It could be just one individual. Maybe even a child.

Let me tell you five differences between a great and a terrible communicator.

  1. A great communicator will speak in a language people understand. If they are speaking to children, they will use illustrations familiar to children. They will know their audience and speak so they understand. For them preparation is part of the excitement.

A terrible communicator expects the listener to make the necessary adjustments to understand. They speak to impress not to be understood. They just assume they are understood.

  1. A great communicator will also know that the only way you will know if they understand what you have said is to allow feedback or questions. If they don’t understand you, your communication is lost.

A terrible communicator will assume that everyone understands all that he said and will grow impatient if there appears to be people who ‘just don’t get it’.

  1. A great communicator will minimize the distractions. They know it doesn’t take much to distract a person’s mind and if their mind is distracted, the message is lost.

A terrible communicator will not even realize that he or she is competing for the person’s attention and thoughts, and will plow ahead thinking they are doing the job. Maybe something they are doing will even offer the distraction.

  1. A great communicator will make sure they say what they mean and mean what they say. They won’t ramble. They will prepare. They won’t confuse the listener with too many things at once. If it is important, they know that they need to say it clearly and simply.

A terrible communicator will keep talking and repeating until they run out of things to say. Then they will get frustrated when the people don’t understand or respond what was said.

  1. A great communicator will use a suitable voice for the occasion. They will try to reflect kindness and care. If it is bad or harsh news, they will be gentle and genuine. Looking the other person in the eye and leaving room for response.

A terrible communicator says what he came to say, perhaps even adding some anger if it is bad or harsh news, and immediately leaves to show authority.

If God has called you to be a communicator, be the best one you can be.

God, the author of communication, says a communicator should not be corrupt or dishonest. Their communication should be encouraging and edifying. (Ephesians 4:29)

God also said that the words of our mouth and the thoughts behind them should be acceptable to God (Psalm 19:14), and, that a good communicator is like a golden apple (Proverbs 25:11)

 

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Posted in Leadership Coaching, Organizational Development, Personal Leadership Tagged with: , , ,

I’ve Lost My Vision!

The year was 2010. I had just come through a major life transition in that I changed the organization I was working with, I changed my address by moving to a different country, our family was in transition with kids going to college and starting new schools, my wife returned to graduate school full-time, and I felt lost.

I don’t know how long I felt that way, but there was definitely a cloud hanging over my head. I’m sure there was some depression, some grieving, some uncertainty, and some fatigue. All of these things connected together to create the perfect storm, and I was in it!

Remember… I don’t get lost (my wife might argue that). I’m a leader. I have vision. I know where I’m going. In fact, a part of my job is to help other leaders to grow the vision God has given them and help to make a reality. Yet here I was , in new territory, completely dumbfounded as to what to do.

I don’t know if you’ve ever felt this way before. Maybe you feel this way today.

Here are some things that I did to help navigate through this time. Some might work for you, they might not. However, I don’t want to be the one encouraging you to grow your vision without sharing one of the toughest seasons of my life in an effort to give you some hope.

#1) It Takes Time

When we entered this transition, I knew it was coming, and I planned for it. The problem was that I miscalculated. It took a long time to get through this transition. I had figured 3 – 6 months, when in reality it took about 3 years.  Some things you can’t run through, you have to walk through (or crawl at times).

Don’t expect vision, energy, passion and determination to just all come back immediately. Be patient.

#2) It Takes Intentionality

It took me a while to figure out what was going on. I was in denial on most fronts. Once I figured it out, I began to attack certain areas of my life by being intentional.

I slept more. I exercised more. I forced myself out of my isolation. I created some space to think and dream as I walked at the beach more. I just found some things that were “life-giving” to me, and I tried to do more of it.  Sleep was a huge one. I was exhausted.

#3) It Takes Getting Help

At some point in the process, I realized that I needed to get some help. I identified 3 – 4 people who I could talk honestly with and I opened up and took some risk. This led to great conversations, some support and a lot of encouragement and hope. I realized I didn’t have to do this completely alone.

#4) It Takes Being Willing to Take Baby Steps

While time is critical, it also took taking some small steps and beginning the long process of regaining momentum and figuring out where I was supposed to be going. It didn’t happen overnight, but as I began to take small steps my vision began to get clearer, and I began to get excited again about where I was heading and what God had called me to do and created me to do.

As I look back on this season of my life it’s a blur.

Some great things happened in my life during these days. I don’t regret this time, but I sure don’t want to go through it again, at least not right now.

Many of us lose our vision from time to time, and it’s OK. Don’t beat yourself up over it. Pay attention to what’s going on, and maybe by working through the 4 things above, this might bring you some hope and resolve, as it did me.

Don’t panic.

Take a step forward. You’re not the only one who’s feeling like this.

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Vision Begins By Looking Back

If you want to create new and compelling vision or refresh what it is you’re doing and where you’re going, take some time to look back first.

When you look back, a couple of important things happen:

#1) YOU REMEMBER

Things move so quickly that it’s often difficult to remember what happened. Life is a blur. Take some time to intentionally remember what has happened over the past 12 months.

Tim Ferriss shared in a recent podcast about an exercise he has done where he goes back over his calendar, and evaluates what things he did over the past year were in the “PLUS” category, and which things were in the “NEGATIVE” category, meaning they took him away from his vision as opposed to pushing him towards his vision. To do this, you need to actively use a calendar program or a detailed journal program.

I use the calendar on my computer to manage my day, week and month. It’s easy to look back and see appointments, block time scheduling, vacation time, and to-do lists. This is a great evaluation tool.

As you do this, look for patterns, look for times in the past year that you felt the most in alignment, and look at your best seasons of productivity.

#2) YOU MAKE CHANGES

When you look back, it’s easier to see some of the traps you were stuck in, or some of the bad decisions you made.

In my life, I had a rough travel year last year. While I was in it, I was in survival mode, just getting from one thing to the next. Now, in looking back, it’s easier to see how I allowed that to happen, and it’s easier to plan forward avoiding these same mistakes.

One example is that last year, we didn’t take the effort to plan a family vacation. We had a number of opportunities with our family, but we squeezed it between a pretty full schedule. This year, the first things that was scheduled on the calendar was a family vacation. It’s booked, set in ink, and the family is committed to it. Now, I can make decisions around that, instead of letting other things crowd out a priority that my wife and I have put in place.

#3) YOU FIGURE OUT WHAT’S MOST IMPORTANT

I don’t like living with regret, but the reality is that all of us think about the things we “wish” we had done in the past. When you look back, your priorities become clearer.

I can look at my schedule from the past year, and I can tell you based on where I spent the majority of my time and energy, what was the most important thing in my work life.

I want to challenge you to figure out what is most important. When you look back, you’re able to see where you drifted out of alignment, where you spent time doing things that didn’t move you towards your vision. Looking back helps you avoid making some of the same mistakes again and again.

Last year, I decided at the last-minute to make a trip. It wasn’t a priority for me, and it wasn’t necessary for me to be there, but I allowed it to creep into my schedule. The trip was fine, but what the effect of that trip impacted me: I was tired and weary from travel, I was away from my family, I had to catch up on important tasks that I put off because I was gone, and I missed some things in my normal routine that I need!  It affected me, yet, in the moment I didn’t see all of that. Looking back, I can see it crystal clear. This year, I want to avoid making these same mistakes.

As you create, refresh or adjust your VISION, don’t forget to look back. We can learn a lot from looking at past decisions, past experiences and our past schedule.

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